Tweed and some Rustic Charm

Tweed fabric and tweed yarn. Two different textiles, made in the same way.

Just mention the word tweed and it conjures up images of English gentleman hunting, fishing and doing such- like manly things. Have you heard of Cheviot Tweed, Shetland Tweed, Gamekeeper Tweed, Sporting Tweed, Thorn proof Tweed or Geographically named Tweed? There is an interesting article on tweed fabric. How it is made, some history and the men who wear it, over here.

What’s the difference between ‘regular’ yarn and tweed yarn?

Tweed yarn 1

In layman’s terms, generally, regular yarn is spun first and then dyed. The interesting part about the creation of tweed yarn is that the fleece is dyed first and then all the different fleece colours are put together in a kind of recipe and then all mixed up in a kind of mixing bowl and then spun. This is what gives it its flecky, speckled look. Below is a far more professional explanation to the making of tweed. Tweed yarn to knit with is made in the same way, except, of course, it stops short of the weaving process.

Tweed Yarn 2

Rustic Charm

Cultivating good taste can never start soon enough .

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Morris and Sons Woollahra Log Cabin Blanket

This yarn consists of Australian Wool, Silk and Cashmere and is wonderful to wear and touch. It is available in 25 colours.

Start off with a log cabin pram blanket. You will need:

1 x 1104 school grey (col1)

1 x 1108 hunter (col 2)

1 x 1118 persian purple (col 3)

2 x 1122 mustard (col 4)

1 x 1109 cranberry (col 5)

1 x 1117 deep cyan (col 6)

1 x 1120 chilli (col 7)

1 x 1121 plaid (col 8)

1 x 1100 grass stain (col 9)

Abbreviations

k1f&b – increase by knitting into the front and back of the next stitch; pm – place marker; slm – slip marker; m1 – make 1 stitch.

Cast on 20sts using Col 1.

Knit 1 row.

Next row: sl1, knit to the end of the row.

Repeat this row until 48 rows have been knitted (or 24 garter stitch ridges). Cast off until there is 1 stitch left on the needle.

Turn the work clockwise, take col 2 and prepare to pick up stitches down the side of the work. You will notice that there are little ‘purl’ bumps down the side of the knitting. Stitches can be picked up between the bumps or through the middle of the bumps. Whichever method you choose, pick up 23sts down the edge. (total 24sts).

Next row: sl1, knit to the end of the row.

Repeat this row until 18 rows have been knitted (or 9 garter stitch ridges). Cast off until there is 1 stitch left on the needle.

Turn the work clockwise. With col 3, pick up 8sts down the edge, 20sts along cast on edge (total 29sts).

Next row: sl1, knit to the end of the row.

Repeat this row until 18 rows have been knitted (or 9 garter stitch ridges). Cast off until there is 1 stitch left on the needle.

Turn the work clockwise. With col 4, pick up 8sts down the edge, 24sts along side (total 33sts).

Next row: sl1, knit to the end of the row.

Repeat this row until 18 rows have been knitted (or 9 garter stitch ridges). Cast off until there is 1 stitch left on the needle.

Turn the work clockwise. With col 5, pick up 8sts down the edge, 20sts along cast off edge, 9sts along side of the piece. (total 38sts).

The last section sets the way the stitches are picked up. There will always be 9sts either side of a cast off section.

Follow the graph below to finish all the sections. There are 25 sections in all.

tweed collection

 

Section 1, 11 and 20 – 1104 school grey (col1); Section 2, 15 and 17 – 1108 hunter (col 2); Section 3, 16 and 22 – 1118 persian purple (col 3); Section 4, 10, 19 and 21 – 1122 mustard (col 4); Section 5, 12 and 25 – 1109 cranberry (col 5); Section 6 and 13 – 1117 deep cyan (col 6); Section 7 and 18 – 1120 chilli (col 7); Section 8, 14 and 23 – 1121 plaid (col 8); Section 9 and 24 – 1100 grass stain (col 9).

This blanket can be as big as you like. Just keep going until you have had enough or the blanket has reached the desired size.

Edge. (If you are using interchangeable circulars, change to the 150cm cord).

With col 2, starting at any corner pick up stitches along the edge, place a marker at the end of the edge, pick up 1 stitch right on the corner, place a marker, pick up sts down next edge, place a marker, pick up 1 stitch right on the corner, place a marker, pick up sts down next edge, place a marker, pick up 1 stitch right on the corner, place a marker, pick up sts down next edge. You will have gone all the way round at this point.

Row 1: (col 2) k1, k1f&b, knit to 1 stitch before the marker, k1f&b, move the marker, k1, move marker, k1f&b, knit to 1 stitch before next marker, k1f&b, move the marker, k1, move marker, k1f&b, knit to 1 stitch before next marker, k1f&b, move the marker, k1, move marker, k1f&b, knit to last 2sts, k1f&b, k1.

Row 2: (col 2) knit.

Row 3: repeat row 1 in col 2.

Refer to colour sequence below to continue.

Row 4: knit.

Row 5: k1, k1f&b, knit to 1 stitch before the marker, k1f&b, move the marker, k1, move marker, k1f&b, knit to 1 stitch before next marker, k1f&b, move the marker, k1, move marker, k1f&b, knit to 1 stitch before next marker, k1f&b, move the marker, k1, move marker, k1f&b, knit to last 2sts, k1f&b, k1. (8sts increased)

Repeat rows 4 and 5 in following colour sequence (in other words, 2 rows of each colour):

1109 cranberry (col 5); 1104 school grey (col 1); 1122 mustard (col 4); 1121 plaid (col 8); 1100 grass stain (col 9); 1118 persian purple (col 3); 1117 deep cyan (col 6); only one row in 1122 mustard (col 4). Cast off. Sew away any ends and stitch up the one corner.

Teddy Bear

The teddy is about 32cm high.

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1 x 3.00mm needles.

1 x 5.00mm needles.

1 x 50g Morris and Sons Woollahra in your chosen colour (sample knit in 1105 Cassia Bark)

Small amount of red yarn for the scarf.

Toy stuffing.

Stitch markers.

A little black yarn for the nose, eyes and eyebrows.

Sewing cotton to match teddy colour.

Legs

C/on 8 sts and knit 1 row.

Next row: sl1, *m1, k1, repeat to last stitch, m1, k1.

Knit 1 row.

Next row: sl1, k1, *m1, k2, repeat from * to last stitch, m1, k1. (22sts)

Slipping the first stitch of every row continue without any shaping until the leg measures

10 cm. Do not cast off. Put stitches on a stitch holder and make one more leg.

Join the legs as follows:

C/on 2sts, knit across stitches of first leg, c/on 3sts, knit across stitches of second leg, c/on 2sts. (51sts). Slipping the first stitch of every row continue without any shaping until the work measures 26cm. Place a marker at the 21cm mark. This marks the line where the neck will be gathered in.

Increase for ears:

Next row: sl1, k11, pm, m1, k1, m1, pm, k25, pm, m1, k1, m1, pm, knit to the end of the row.

Knit 1 row.

Next row: sl1, knit to marker, slm, m1, knit to next marker, m1, slm, work to next marker, slm, m1, knit to next marker, m1, slm, knit to the end of the row.

Knit 1 row.

Repeat last 2 rows 3 more times. You should have 11sts between markers.

Next row: knit to marker, slm, k4, k3tog, k4, slm, knit to next marker, slm, k4, k3tog, k4, slm, knit to the end of the row.

Knit 1 row.

Next row: knit to marker, slm, k3, k3tog, k3, slm, knit to next marker, slm, k3, k3tog, k3, slm, knit to the end of the row. Cast off.

Arms (make 2)

C/on 10sts and knit 1 row.

Next row: sl1, k1, *m1, k2, repeat from * to last 2sts, k2.

Knit 1 row.

Next row: sl1, k2, *m1, k3, repeat from * to last 2sts, k2. (18sts)

Slipping the first stitch of every row continue without any shaping until the work measures 8cm. Cast off.

Nose.

C/on 9sts and knit 1 row.

Next row: k1f&b in every stitch. (18sts)

Slipping the first stitch of every row work 6 rows.

Cast off loosely.

Finishing.

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Fold the teddy and sew up inner legs seams. Sew half way up the centre back. Sew across the top of the teddy’s head and down the centre back of the head and a little way down the centre back. Leave an opening in the centre back for stuffing. Start stuffing the teddy with toy filling. The stuffing can be firm but not so firm that it stretches the knitting to reveal the stuffing inside. When he looks and feels right close centre back seam. It is advisable to keeping checking that the overall appearance of the teddy is symmetrical.

Using the sewing thread double make a running stitch all around at the neck marker. Pull up tight and secure. Demarcate the ears in the same way by starting at the beginning of the increase of the ear across to the top of the head. (refer to image). Sew row ends of nose. Place the nose on the bottom half of the face and secure, leaving an opening for stuffing. Sew row ends of each arm and stuff. Sew across the top of the arm. Place the arms about two garter ridges down from the neck and secure. Using black wool and referring to the image of the face embroider the nose, eyes and eyebrows.

Scarf.

With 5.00mm needles c/on 11sts.

Next row: *k2, p2, repeat to last stitch, p1.

Repeat this row until the scarf measures 50cm. C/off. Sew away the ends.

To prevent the scarf from getting lost, secure it behind the teddy’s neck with a couple of stitches.

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As usual we wish many happy hours of creating beautiful things for wonderful people. Until we meet again.

 

 

 

 

Morris and Sons Estate, 100% Australian Wool

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‘I just want a stock standard, good quality, well priced, Australian wool, ball of yarn’. We hear this in our stores all the time. We may have mentioned this before, we aim to please and deliver. Enter, Morris and Sons 8 ply 100% Australian wool in 50 colours, Morris and Sons 4 ply 100% Australian wool in 54 colours (a dream come true for Fair Isle knitters, we think) and Morris and Sons 14 ply 100% Australian wool in 55 colours. The 14 ply yarn is the ideal yarn to get somebody started on the road to knitting bliss. There is no need to tell them about the pitfalls in this road just yet. Get them good and hooked. They’ll find out soon enough!

We were lucky enough to arm wrestle a very accommodating (thanks Mum) crocheter into crocheting us our Rainbow blanket using all the Morris Estate 8 ply colours. Winter is around the corner why don’t you give this a go. Watch it morph from a tummy warmer to a knee rug to a blanket big enough to cover a person or two on the couch.

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And, as there will definitely be yarn left over you might want to keep your eye on this little work in progress. The pattern should be available soon. That’s if you want it?! Let us know via Facebook or leave us a message below whether we should write up the pattern.

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A Little Promotion using Morris and Sons Estate 8 ply

To get you started we have teamed up with Jen from Little Yellow Cat to offer our readers a little promotion. She has designed a Fair Isle hat, the Katie Beanie, in Morris and Sons Estate 8 ply. The pattern for her Katie Beanie normally costs $6.00. Up until midnight on the 30 April it will be available to you for $3.00. Using the download discount code: morris2014

To take advantage of this offer go to Little Yellow Cat and click on “add to cart”. Don’t forget to enter the discount code morris2014 to get your pattern at the discounted price.

Brown beanie uses #8036 Egg Yolk, #8007 Chocolate and #8047 Fishing Green.
White beanie uses #8018 Posey, #8002 Voile and #8045 Canopy

Until the next time, here’s wishing you all a lovely week and as usual make time for needlecraft every day.

 

New Noro and a PomPom or Two

Blog Collage 08.04.14

 

This week, come on an adventure with us as we make the most perfect, velvety pom poms ever. Attach your new pompoms to our week end winter knit cowl in the new Noro Yarn, Kibou.

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We are loving the new Noro Kibou yarn. A wool, cotton, silk mix. Sort of like Taiyo without the polyamide, and, of course, thinner. It knits up as an 8 ply. For those of you who are sensitive to wearing wool too close to the skin, this is certainly an alternative yarn. It has the most gorgeous tweed look about it when it is knit up. As a result you get the snugly, warm, wintery look without the scratch-itch factor. The world is indeed a lovely place when this happens!
The meterage goes on forever. Our cowl took only one ball. You could probably whip it up over the Easter week end (good alternative to overindulging in chocolate Easter eggs). This cowl is just the right size to pop into your handbag, to wear under a coat and, well, it has pompoms for some winter cheer! We know you’ll love it and want to make it, and we do aim to please, so, without much more ado, here is the pattern:

Materials: 1 x 100g Noro Kibou in Col 3 and a 60cm circular needle size 4.00mm.
We used Col 3 because we thought it looked particularly tweedy. There are other colours available.
Top row from left to right: col 01, col 03, col 05.
Bottom row from left to right: col 08, col 09, col 11.

Kibou Collage 1

Kibou Collage 2

Cast on 162 sts and stocking stitch 20cm in the round. Change to a 3×3 rib and continue (about 10cm) until you have enough yarn to cast off and then cast off loosely.
Use the left over two ply yarn for the neck tie. Double it up a few times and make a cord. Thread the cord through the base of the 3x3rib and attach the pompoms, one at each end.

On to the pompoms…
There are pompoms and then there are these pompoms. First of all, throw away those cardboard circles and forks. They may make pompoms of some sort but they don’t make these pompoms. We are talking about soft velveteen pompoms that make you want to stroke them. According to those in the know this pompom maker from the Clover brand is the best thing since sliced bread. It is what we used to make the pompoms for our cowl. There are instructions on how to use the tool on the back of the packaging. Follow our tutorial to get the best results. You may not want to stop and will certainly find yourself in pompom heaven. We hope you enjoy the tutorial and find time to send us images of your pompoms and how you have used them.

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What you will need:
Large Clover Pompom Maker as above. (We used the smaller one of the two).
1 x 50g/700m Morris and Sons Empire 2 ply.
1 skein of DMC stranded cotton in a colour to match your pompom yarn.
Sharp pair of scissors.
A saucer of water.

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Flip open the two ‘hooks’ and using the 2 ply yarn start to wrap the first half of the pompom.

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Keep wrapping until the ‘hooks’ are full. Make sure they are really fat and full and you have wrapped the yarn around evenly. Fold the hook back when you are done.

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This entails quite a lot of wrapping. You may want to rest your arm and have a cup of tea before embarking on the second half.

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Repeat for the other side. Your wrapped work should look like this. We had 15grams of yarn left after this.

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Using a sharp pair of scissors cut the wound yarn along the outside. Hold the tool in your hand and make sure the hooks don’t flip open. When the yarn has been cut right round put the tool down.
Take the DMC stranded cotton, cut about a meter length off. Fold it in half and wet it in the saucer of water. Dab the excess water off. Slip the cotton between the discs and tie the pompom tightly. The wet cotton sticks when you tie down the knot and ensures that the tie off remains tight. Do not cut the threads of cotton. You’ll use these to tie the pompom onto the neck thread. Remove the hardware.

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You will have a pompom that looks like a cross between and bedraggled mouse and a wrecked ball of yarn. That’s all ok and perfectly normal. Underneath all that hides the makings of the real thing.

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All it needs is a haircut. Not a trim, a haircut. Again take your scissors and begin to cut the pompom into shape. It’s perfectly ok to take off about 1cm.

Ba-da-bing, Ba-da-bang! The secret is out, 2 ply yarn and a decent haircut, that’s all it takes really.

Good luck and have fun!

For The Love Of 2 Ply

We already have the slow food movement. Let us introduce you to the slow knit and crochet movement. A very odd comparison. We think not. A quick google search on the definition of 2 ply, confirmed that it is a very thin yarn that lends itself to fine cobweb knitting or crochet. Historically, we have visions of Shetland shawls passing through wedding rings. Babies wrapped in shawls, crafted patiently by great aunts from mother countries far and wide. Words like, tradition, unhurried and simple pleasures come to mind when creating with 2 ply yarn, minus the calories.

Come into any of our stores and enjoy the journey with our free crochet Silver Fox Scarf pattern in Morris and Sons Maya 2 ply lace weight 100% baby Alpaca Yarn

Image

Click to download the Silver Fox Scarf

The new Rowan No 55 has arrived in store as well. Fortuitously it has some darling 2 ply patterns in it. We have a favourite on page 75. Come and see…….

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The beautiful Slovenia on page 75 is free to download when you register on the knitrowan website. We have pulled out the colours from our 2 ply alpaca range.

So, before you embark on that heirloom baby shawl put your toe in the water by trying smaller projects and fall in love with the joy that is working in 2 ply.

Daisy Crochet Headband

daisycrochetheadband

This lovely girls crochet headband is a new Morris pattern. It is a very quick project and would be perfect for a summer accessory. The pattern can be extended to suit any sized head, so ladies, you can wear it too!

The pattern uses the durable and colourful Morris Avalon Pima cotton in three colours.

The pattern and yarn is available to purchase online or in store.

Crochet knowledge required:

  • Treble decreases (explained in the pattern)
  • Treble stitch
  • Double crochet
  • Chain

Rainbow Blanket

Picnic. Blanket Shot

To all those crocheters out there!!! One of the most popular Morris Patterns this season has been the beautiful Rainbow Blanket. This is a crochet pattern that is sure to keep you occupied for months.

The chevron design creates a lovely ripple pattern in your blanket. The size of the blanket easily covers a queen size bed. It’s worked up here in 53 different Morris Estate 8ply colours. The Morris Estate yarn is an affordable 100% Merino wool.

At the moment the kit is sold in store or online and can be sent out internationally. You are also able to buy the pattern and yarn online separately.