The New World of Knitting Acronyms, Abbreviations and Words in general.

When did this whole new language start? Not completely sure if it was the advent of SMSing or computers, but it seems like it is definitely part of the new knitting world order. We thought that a blog post on what they all mean would be quite in order. As strange as we find this, we will respect it and educate ourselves. We hope that this will equip you with the language tools to confidently walk into the LYS and flaunt your knitting parlance.

And there you have it! LYS!?

LYS – Local Yarn Store.

LYSO – Local Yarn Shop Owner.

DPNs – Double Point Needles.

UFO – Unfinished Object.

KIP – Knit in Public.

WIP – Work in Progress.

CIRCS – Circular Knitting Needles.

FROGGING- ripping out knitting, from ‘rip-it, rip-it’.

TINK – is KNIT spelt backwards and means un-knitting.

TINKING – the act of un-knitting.

SABLE – Stash Acquisition Beyond Life Expectancy. Similar to the patchwork world’s, she who dies with the most fabric, wins.

SSS – Second Sock Syndrome.

KAL – Knitalong. Is when a few or many knitters knit the same garment in a given time period and sometimes for a particular cause or event or sometimes, just because.

WHACO – Wool Housing and Containment Overflow. No cure, sorry.

YARN BARFa big lump of yarn that accidentally gets pulled out of a new center-pull ball, when you’re trying to find the end.

If you really want to get into it and learn a whole new language there is a page on the Ravelry Knitting lingo page. If there are any we should of, let us know.

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Last blog post we were looking at Manos Wool Clasica. This yarn just grows and grows on us. Here is the hat we promised. You can find the pattern here. We used one skein and had quite a bit left over. Making it more slouchy, as we did, will not be a problem. Our sample is in colour 7458 Mulled Wine.

A little more colour for this blog post. Noro Haniwa. Find the pattern for the blanket and beanie here.

Rust and Iron Garter Stitch Bias Blanket

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Into the Woods Crochet Beanie for Babies

Cicero said, “A home without books is a body without soul”. There’s just one word to replace here, wouldn’t you agree?

Until we meet again.

Squishy Fingerless Mittens in Manos Wool Clasica

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It’s so very cold in parts of Australia at the moment. Such weather calls for mittens, hats and scarves. In a three part series we’ll post one of each for free using the very lovely Manos Wool Clasica. With a bit of luck the winter will last long enough and we’ll squeeze in a snugly couch rug as well. The Manos Clasica comes in a variety of delectable colours. Fortuitously the Manos Clasica has a tension of between 14-18sts to 10 cm and recommends needle sizes of between 5.00-6.00mm. This broadens your choice quite a bit.

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To start us off, here is an easy and quick pair of mittens. These mittens are ideal for beginner knitters who want to take their skills up a notch. They are knit in the round and the thick yarn makes them a quick knit. Either mitten can be worn on either hand. Easy!

Abbreviations

k-knit; p-purl; m1-make one; pm-place marker; sm-slip marker; dpns-double point needles.

Requirements

1 hank of Manos Wool Clasica in a variegated or solid colour way. We worked quite sparingly with the yarn. If you are knitting a larger size we recommend you buy an extra hank of yarn.

4.5mm dpns and 2 stitch markers and a length of waste yarn.. If you are familiar with the magic loop method of knitting in the round , use a 4.5mm circular needle with an 80cm cord.

Directions (make two the same).

Cast/on 39sts. Close to work in the round being careful not to twist the stitches.

Work * k2, p1* rib for 8cm.

Thumb Shaping

Set up round: k2, pm, m1, p1, m1, pm, continue in rib pattern to the end of the row.

Round 1: k2, sm, m1, kto centre st, purl centre stitch, knit to marker, m1, sm, knit in pattern to the end of the row.

Round 2&3: Work the stitches as they present themselves, (ie knit the knit stitches and purl the purl stitches). Repeat last three rounds until there are 15sts between the stitch markers. Knit 2 more rows.

Next round: work to the first marker, remove the marker and slip the thumb gusset stitches onto a piece of waste yarn, remove the marker, cast on 1 stitch, and continue in pattern to the end of the round.

Work 12 more rounds in rib pattern as set. Cast off.

Finish Thumb

Pick up stitches from waste yarn. Pick up 3sts in the gap between first and last stitch of thumb. Distribute stitches on three or four needles. Work 6 rows in pattern as set. Cast off.

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Some hints on how to change the size of the mittens.

  1. Use 4.00mm needles instead of 4.5mm. This will make them a little smaller overall.
  2. The pattern repeat is 3 stitches. To make them smaller or larger subtract or add stitches in lots of three.
  3. For a larger thumb gusset repeat thumb increases until there are 17sts between the markers.
  4. For a smaller thumb gusset repeat thumb increases until there are 13sts between the markers.
  5. Although we have not experimented with this we think that using 8 ply yarn and 3.25mm needles will produce a child’s size.

We wish you lots of fun and experimentation! Let us know how you go and send us images we can post on Facebook. Clare couldn’t help herself and just had to model our sample pair. A big thumbs up from her!

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Happy knitting and we look forward to presenting our Manos Wool Clasica Beanie to you soon!

 

 

Tweed and some Rustic Charm

Tweed fabric and tweed yarn. Two different textiles, made in the same way.

Just mention the word tweed and it conjures up images of English gentleman hunting, fishing and doing such- like manly things. Have you heard of Cheviot Tweed, Shetland Tweed, Gamekeeper Tweed, Sporting Tweed, Thorn proof Tweed or Geographically named Tweed? There is an interesting article on tweed fabric. How it is made, some history and the men who wear it, over here.

What’s the difference between ‘regular’ yarn and tweed yarn?

Tweed yarn 1

In layman’s terms, generally, regular yarn is spun first and then dyed. The interesting part about the creation of tweed yarn is that the fleece is dyed first and then all the different fleece colours are put together in a kind of recipe and then all mixed up in a kind of mixing bowl and then spun. This is what gives it its flecky, speckled look. Below is a far more professional explanation to the making of tweed. Tweed yarn to knit with is made in the same way, except, of course, it stops short of the weaving process.

Tweed Yarn 2

Rustic Charm

Cultivating good taste can never start soon enough .

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Morris and Sons Woollahra Log Cabin Blanket

This yarn consists of Australian Wool, Silk and Cashmere and is wonderful to wear and touch. It is available in 25 colours.

Start off with a log cabin pram blanket. You will need:

1 x 1104 school grey (col1)

1 x 1108 hunter (col 2)

1 x 1118 persian purple (col 3)

2 x 1122 mustard (col 4)

1 x 1109 cranberry (col 5)

1 x 1117 deep cyan (col 6)

1 x 1120 chilli (col 7)

1 x 1121 plaid (col 8)

1 x 1100 grass stain (col 9)

Abbreviations

k1f&b – increase by knitting into the front and back of the next stitch; pm – place marker; slm – slip marker; m1 – make 1 stitch.

Cast on 20sts using Col 1.

Knit 1 row.

Next row: sl1, knit to the end of the row.

Repeat this row until 48 rows have been knitted (or 24 garter stitch ridges). Cast off until there is 1 stitch left on the needle.

Turn the work clockwise, take col 2 and prepare to pick up stitches down the side of the work. You will notice that there are little ‘purl’ bumps down the side of the knitting. Stitches can be picked up between the bumps or through the middle of the bumps. Whichever method you choose, pick up 23sts down the edge. (total 24sts).

Next row: sl1, knit to the end of the row.

Repeat this row until 18 rows have been knitted (or 9 garter stitch ridges). Cast off until there is 1 stitch left on the needle.

Turn the work clockwise. With col 3, pick up 8sts down the edge, 20sts along cast on edge (total 29sts).

Next row: sl1, knit to the end of the row.

Repeat this row until 18 rows have been knitted (or 9 garter stitch ridges). Cast off until there is 1 stitch left on the needle.

Turn the work clockwise. With col 4, pick up 8sts down the edge, 24sts along side (total 33sts).

Next row: sl1, knit to the end of the row.

Repeat this row until 18 rows have been knitted (or 9 garter stitch ridges). Cast off until there is 1 stitch left on the needle.

Turn the work clockwise. With col 5, pick up 8sts down the edge, 20sts along cast off edge, 9sts along side of the piece. (total 38sts).

The last section sets the way the stitches are picked up. There will always be 9sts either side of a cast off section.

Follow the graph below to finish all the sections. There are 25 sections in all.

tweed collection

 

Section 1, 11 and 20 – 1104 school grey (col1); Section 2, 15 and 17 – 1108 hunter (col 2); Section 3, 16 and 22 – 1118 persian purple (col 3); Section 4, 10, 19 and 21 – 1122 mustard (col 4); Section 5, 12 and 25 – 1109 cranberry (col 5); Section 6 and 13 – 1117 deep cyan (col 6); Section 7 and 18 – 1120 chilli (col 7); Section 8, 14 and 23 – 1121 plaid (col 8); Section 9 and 24 – 1100 grass stain (col 9).

This blanket can be as big as you like. Just keep going until you have had enough or the blanket has reached the desired size.

Edge. (If you are using interchangeable circulars, change to the 150cm cord).

With col 2, starting at any corner pick up stitches along the edge, place a marker at the end of the edge, pick up 1 stitch right on the corner, place a marker, pick up sts down next edge, place a marker, pick up 1 stitch right on the corner, place a marker, pick up sts down next edge, place a marker, pick up 1 stitch right on the corner, place a marker, pick up sts down next edge. You will have gone all the way round at this point.

Row 1: (col 2) k1, k1f&b, knit to 1 stitch before the marker, k1f&b, move the marker, k1, move marker, k1f&b, knit to 1 stitch before next marker, k1f&b, move the marker, k1, move marker, k1f&b, knit to 1 stitch before next marker, k1f&b, move the marker, k1, move marker, k1f&b, knit to last 2sts, k1f&b, k1.

Row 2: (col 2) knit.

Row 3: repeat row 1 in col 2.

Refer to colour sequence below to continue.

Row 4: knit.

Row 5: k1, k1f&b, knit to 1 stitch before the marker, k1f&b, move the marker, k1, move marker, k1f&b, knit to 1 stitch before next marker, k1f&b, move the marker, k1, move marker, k1f&b, knit to 1 stitch before next marker, k1f&b, move the marker, k1, move marker, k1f&b, knit to last 2sts, k1f&b, k1. (8sts increased)

Repeat rows 4 and 5 in following colour sequence (in other words, 2 rows of each colour):

1109 cranberry (col 5); 1104 school grey (col 1); 1122 mustard (col 4); 1121 plaid (col 8); 1100 grass stain (col 9); 1118 persian purple (col 3); 1117 deep cyan (col 6); only one row in 1122 mustard (col 4). Cast off. Sew away any ends and stitch up the one corner.

Teddy Bear

The teddy is about 32cm high.

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1 x 3.00mm needles.

1 x 5.00mm needles.

1 x 50g Morris and Sons Woollahra in your chosen colour (sample knit in 1105 Cassia Bark)

Small amount of red yarn for the scarf.

Toy stuffing.

Stitch markers.

A little black yarn for the nose, eyes and eyebrows.

Sewing cotton to match teddy colour.

Legs

C/on 8 sts and knit 1 row.

Next row: sl1, *m1, k1, repeat to last stitch, m1, k1.

Knit 1 row.

Next row: sl1, k1, *m1, k2, repeat from * to last stitch, m1, k1. (22sts)

Slipping the first stitch of every row continue without any shaping until the leg measures

10 cm. Do not cast off. Put stitches on a stitch holder and make one more leg.

Join the legs as follows:

C/on 2sts, knit across stitches of first leg, c/on 3sts, knit across stitches of second leg, c/on 2sts. (51sts). Slipping the first stitch of every row continue without any shaping until the work measures 26cm. Place a marker at the 21cm mark. This marks the line where the neck will be gathered in.

Increase for ears:

Next row: sl1, k11, pm, m1, k1, m1, pm, k25, pm, m1, k1, m1, pm, knit to the end of the row.

Knit 1 row.

Next row: sl1, knit to marker, slm, m1, knit to next marker, m1, slm, work to next marker, slm, m1, knit to next marker, m1, slm, knit to the end of the row.

Knit 1 row.

Repeat last 2 rows 3 more times. You should have 11sts between markers.

Next row: knit to marker, slm, k4, k3tog, k4, slm, knit to next marker, slm, k4, k3tog, k4, slm, knit to the end of the row.

Knit 1 row.

Next row: knit to marker, slm, k3, k3tog, k3, slm, knit to next marker, slm, k3, k3tog, k3, slm, knit to the end of the row. Cast off.

Arms (make 2)

C/on 10sts and knit 1 row.

Next row: sl1, k1, *m1, k2, repeat from * to last 2sts, k2.

Knit 1 row.

Next row: sl1, k2, *m1, k3, repeat from * to last 2sts, k2. (18sts)

Slipping the first stitch of every row continue without any shaping until the work measures 8cm. Cast off.

Nose.

C/on 9sts and knit 1 row.

Next row: k1f&b in every stitch. (18sts)

Slipping the first stitch of every row work 6 rows.

Cast off loosely.

Finishing.

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Fold the teddy and sew up inner legs seams. Sew half way up the centre back. Sew across the top of the teddy’s head and down the centre back of the head and a little way down the centre back. Leave an opening in the centre back for stuffing. Start stuffing the teddy with toy filling. The stuffing can be firm but not so firm that it stretches the knitting to reveal the stuffing inside. When he looks and feels right close centre back seam. It is advisable to keeping checking that the overall appearance of the teddy is symmetrical.

Using the sewing thread double make a running stitch all around at the neck marker. Pull up tight and secure. Demarcate the ears in the same way by starting at the beginning of the increase of the ear across to the top of the head. (refer to image). Sew row ends of nose. Place the nose on the bottom half of the face and secure, leaving an opening for stuffing. Sew row ends of each arm and stuff. Sew across the top of the arm. Place the arms about two garter ridges down from the neck and secure. Using black wool and referring to the image of the face embroider the nose, eyes and eyebrows.

Scarf.

With 5.00mm needles c/on 11sts.

Next row: *k2, p2, repeat to last stitch, p1.

Repeat this row until the scarf measures 50cm. C/off. Sew away the ends.

To prevent the scarf from getting lost, secure it behind the teddy’s neck with a couple of stitches.

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As usual we wish many happy hours of creating beautiful things for wonderful people. Until we meet again.

 

 

 

 

Accessories and a Picot Edge Scarf Pattern

Ask any craftsman. What is paramount to the success of a job well done? Nine out of ten times the answer will be, ‘the use of good tools.’ A bad workman always blames his tools, you know, in some weird way, he is correct. Just saying, he may show a teeny wheeny tiny little improvement with better tools. Give the guy the benefit of the doubt! Bad tools are frustrating!

When writing patterns, one of the first things to note is a list of supplies needed for the project. How much thought is given to the list? For fun, here are a couple of anecdotes and our solutions to them.

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“Stitch markers! Smitch markers! I’ll just use a piece of contrast yarn and tie it around the needle”.

It’s yarn, pretty good chance you will inadvertently turn it into a stitch.

The tail will felt into your work.

If it’s a piece of yarn of unknown origin, it may not be colour fast and bleed into your lovely white baptism gown that you are knitting in 2 ply.

Where is a piece of scrap yarn when you need it?

You will have stitch markers for a long time and for every project.

“I have a huge bundle of my great-aunt’s knitting needles. That’ll do. There will be something in there I can use”.

You will have every number, but only one of each.

Tortoise shell. Politically incorrect, poor tortoise!

Aluminum, never warms up in your hand. Bad for arthritis.

Buy beautiful nickel plated, laminated birch wood and bamboo needles. Use interchangeable circulars (or circs in modern parlance) for everything.

“Row counter. Why do I need one of those? I’ve got plenty pieces of paper”.

OMG! Where did I put that piece of paper? Is there anymore to say!

Invest in a row counter or two or three. One for every project, preferably one you can slip onto your needle.

Required yarn: Manos Silk Blend, a luxurious blend of 70% Merino Extra fine Wool and 30% Silk.

“My friend has some pet alpacas and she spun this wool and gave it to me. Surely I can use that”.

This last anecdote generally only has repercussions a few weeks, months or years down the track. “It doesn’t feel like/look like your sample at all”.

Really, how odd!

We hope you enjoyed our take on things that happen around us all the time.

 

Picot Edge Scarf Pattern

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If you knit nothing else this winter, knit this,

Requirements

1 x 100g Manos Fino . Our sample was knit in col 2500-50 silhouette. Try it in other yummy colours in the range.

1 x 3.50mm 80cm circular needles

A kitchen scale capable of measuring grams. It’s not necessary to go out and buy one, (unless you want to get into baking as well). Find a friend with one.

Method

C/on 3sts.

Knit 1 row.

Next row: c/on 6sts, c/off 2sts, knit to the end of the row.

Repeat this row until there is 5 gram of yarn left (this is where the kitchen scale comes in).

Picot edge cast off

C/on 2sts, c/off 6sts, *slip the remaining stitch from right needle to left needle, c/on 2sts, c/off 6sts, repeat from

* to the end of the row.

It’s possible that the end of the row does not have 6sts to cast off, just cast off what ever stitches remain.

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Until we meet again. Make many beautiful things!

 

 

A Sewing Book Review by Ella (11 years old)

Sewing School, 21 Sewing Projects Kids Will Love to Make, by Amie Petronis Plumley and Andria Lisle

Ella loves making things. When the Sewing School book arrived at Morris and Sons we knew exactly whom we would be roping in to do a book review for us. Ella spent the day with her Aunty Jan and made the eye glasses case on page 90. Don’t look past Ella’s beautiful scarf, her Aunty Jan made for her out of Noro Taiyo yarn.

Ella book

In Ella’s words:

“It all started on a cold morning at my holiday house in Queenscliff. On this particular morning I decided it was time to make the eye-see-you glasses case. I got out the felt, needles, thread, scissors and this book. And it was then that I realised my needle was too blunt, so, I sent my Mum out to get more. But in actual fact when she got back I was almost done.

Every 5-10 minutes we took photos of me moving forward, through the steps. In the photos you will see it’s similar to those in the book. You will have so much fun making this cool case for an awesome present or to keep for your own.”

Ella (11 yrs old)

Ella Book Review 9

Well done Ella. It looks very awesome

The glasses case took Ella 2.5 hours to complete. She has also let us know that she is going to be making the skirt on page 110. We are looking forward to seeing images of her sporting her new skirt.

The book and all the accoutrements to make the above projects and many more are available in all our stores.

It was a delight to work with Ella and her Aunty Jan and Ella’s Mum. Thank you for doing the review for us Ella. Much appreciated. We hope that this will fire up other girls your age to get into sewing.

 

 

Rainbow Scarf Pattern

This is a scarf that Maureen was wearing when she came shopping in our store. It looked so cheerful, we whipped it off her neck and wrote up the pattern for you.

Next time you visit us in our store wearing something fabulous that you have made, beware! There is no telling what we will do.

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Maureen’s Rainbow Scarf

You will need

3mm crochet hook. (these are currently our favourite hooks).

1 x Schoeppel Zauberball (sample is made in colour 1564).

British crochet terms used throughout.

Ch – chain

Dc – double crochet

Tr – treble

Sl st – slip stitch

Sts – stitches

Rep – repeat

 

Method

Chain 32.

Row 1: work 1dc in 3rd chain from the hook, work 1dc in each chain stitch to the end of the row. (31sts)

Row 2: ch3, *miss 2sts, 3tr into next stitch, rep to the end of row. (there should be 10 sets of 3 trebles).

Row 3: ch3, *miss 2sts and tr3 into space between trebles, rep to the end of the row.

Repeat row 3 until there is enough yarn left to make the scalloped edges for the top and bottom of the scarf.

Last row: (scallop edge) ch3, *work 6tr into next space between trebles, sl st into middle of next treble set (from previous row), repeat from * to last space, work 6tr and 1 sl st in last space.

Fasten off.

Repeat last row along beginning of scarf working over the row of dcs into the spaces.

Fasten off and sew away any ends.

 

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From all of us, happy knitting and crocheting. Come in and say hello and show us what you’re making.

 

 

 

 

Winter is here.

Winter has officially arrived in the Southern Hemisphere. For those of you who are seasonal knitters it is time to bring out the needles and begin getting into your winter past time. Those of us who knit all year round often wonder what seasonal knitters do in Spring and Summer. Do we really wonder? Not really. It’s so exciting to see every one get cosy with their needles, some snuggly yarn and a hot chocolate. So many young girls have been coming in for their supplies and YouTube under their arm. Remember, we’re here to help if YouTube can’t!

We have two snippets for you this fortnight. a free book and Yarnman Miranda has his first say.

We have knitted a few items from this Cleckheaton pattern book.

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The yarn used in the book is all California, made in Turkey, 100g balls (185m). An 8 ply yarn. We did use our own Norway to knit up the cream jumper, so fabulously modeled by our very own Emily. Norway is available in 6 natural shades.

Emily reckons this is a very wearable and comfy jumper indeed!

Come into our Sydney or Melbourne store and purchase the yarn to knit one of the jumpers in the book and we will include the pattern book for free. This offer lasts while stocks last.

And just to conclude your winter ensemble. One of the hats and a voluptuous infinity scarf.

We think you should be pretty much set for the upcoming winter.

And, last, but not least.

 

Yarnman Miranda

Yarnman Miranda speaks……….

Actually, she is totally at a loss for words and that right on her first Yarnman Miranda speaks segment, but she is truly speechless.

This is all we could get out of her:

“Ladies, really……….?!

Until the next time. Try to make something beautiful often.

Manos is in the house!

Manos del Uruguay has arrived in our stores. It’s all here and we are selling it out of the boxes. These kettle dyed fibres will break down all your resistance to building yet more stash. Remember that resolution you made to use what you have, well forget that, that resolution is gone! We found a customer wandering around the pillar, mumbling ‘delicious, delicious’.

In our delicious woolly arsenal we have the following:

Manos Maxima – 100% extrafine merino, Manos Fino – 30%silk and 70% extrafine merino, Manos Silk Blend – 30% silk and 70% extrafine merino, Wool Clasica – handspun pure wool, Manos Serena – 60% baby alpaca and 40% pima cotton, Manos Lace – 70% baby alpaca, 25% silk and 5% cashmere, Manos Alegria (sock yarn) 75% superwash merino and 25% polyamide.

100% Fair Trade and Handmade in Uruguay. You can read all about the history and the way the co-ops function here.

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Marelle’s sock is coming along nicely and the colours are awesome. Knit in colour 9275 and loving how the heel colour has worked out.

Give Manos Maxima a go and crochet a little kerchief with two hanks of Manos Maxima, It’s soft, squishy and warm. Also, a heads up to those of you who find wool a little uncomfortable against the skin. Not this one.

You will need:

4.50mm crochet hook

2 hanks of Manos Maxima in your chosen colours. Our sample uses M2552 Foil and M2175 Shocking.

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Work 8ch and close to a circle.

Row 1: ch3, 1tr into base of three chain, 2ch, 2tr, 2ch, 1tr, 5ch, 1tr, 2ch, 2tr, 2ch, 2tr into the circle. Turn.

Row 2: ch3, 1tr into base of three chain, 1tr in next stitch, 2ch, 2tr, 2ch, 1tr in next stitch, 7tr in 5ch space, 1tr in next stitch, 2ch, 2tr, 2ch, 1tr in next stitch, 2 tr in top of turning chain. Turn.

Row 3: ch3, 1tr into base of three chain, 1tr in next 2 stitches, 2ch, 2tr, 2ch, 1tr in next 4 stitches, 3tr in next stitch, 1tr in next 4 stitches, 2ch, 2tr, 2ch, 1tr in next 2 stitches, 2 tr in top of turning chain. Turn.

Row 4: ch3, 1tr into base of three chain, 1tr in next 3 stitches, 2ch, 2tr, 2ch, 1tr in next 5 stitches, 3tr in next stitch, 1tr in next 5 stitches, 2ch, 2tr, 2ch, 1tr in next 3 stitches, 2 tr in top of turning chain. Turn.

Row 5: ch3, 1tr into base of three chain, 1tr in next 4 stitches, 2ch, 2tr, 2ch, 1tr in next 6 stitches, 3tr in next stitch, 1tr in next 6 stitches, 2ch, 2tr, 2ch, 1tr in next 4 stitches, 2 tr in top of turning chain. Turn.

Row 6: ch3, 1tr into base of three chain, 1tr in next 5 stitches, 2ch, 2tr, 2ch, 1tr in next 7 stitches, 3tr in next stitch, 1tr in next 7 stitches, 2ch, 2tr, 2ch, 1tr in next 5 stitches, 2 tr in top of turning chain. Turn.

Row 7: ch3, 1tr into base of three chain, 1tr in next 6 stitches, 2ch, 2tr, 2ch, 1tr in next 8 stitches, 3tr in next stitch, 1tr in next 8 stitches, 2ch, 2tr, 2ch, 1tr in next 6 stitches, 2 tr in top of turning chain. Turn.

Row 8: ch3, 1tr into base of three chain, 1tr in next 7 stitches, 2ch, 2tr, 2ch, 1tr in next 9 stitches, 3tr in next stitch, 1tr in next 9 stitches, 2ch, 2tr, 2ch, 1tr in next 7 stitches, 2 tr in top of turning chain. Turn.

Row 9: ch3, 1tr into base of three chain, 1tr in next 8 stitches, 2ch, 2tr, 2ch, 1tr in next 10 stitches, 3tr in next stitch, 1tr in next 10 stitches, 2ch, 2tr, 2ch, 1tr in next 8 stitches, 2 tr in top of turning chain. Turn.

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If you don’t want to put beads in, just ignore the little black dots.

At this point the increases will make sense. Continue until the yarn has been used up. The colour sequence runs as follows. (Of course, you know you can buy more yarn and keep going and make a big wrap around for winter).

19 rows in colour A, 1 row in colour B, 3 rows in Colour A, 2 rows in colour B, 4 rows in colour A and 11 rows in colour B. Last row in Colour A, scalloped edge as follows:

Ch3, 4tr into base of chain, skip 2sts, dc in next stitch, skip 2sts, *5tr in next stitch, skip 2sts, dc in next stitch, repeat from * all around.

Sew away any ends and block if you so desire.

Yarnman Miranda

Yarnman Miranda discovers Manos! It really is that good!

Until we meet again. Happy crafting.

 

 

 

 

Why Knit Socks?

Beautiful examples of Turkish wedding socks.

We would love to write a history of the ‘humble sock’ but so many fantastic books have been written on the subject that we thought we would approach this blog post from a whole different angle. Keep reading…

Since the advent of the Internet, sock knitting has taken on cult status. A quick search under sock groups in Ravelry reveal a staggering 18 pages with 857 matches. The group with the highest membership, Sock Knitter’s Anonymous, boasts 17845 members. Makes you think, doesn’t it?
Really, what is there left to say on the subject? Except this: We have found a sock pattern that has been written in Rhyme. We thought the journey of embarking on this ‘recipe’ would be a whole heap of fun.
If you do complete a pair of socks using this rhyme, please share it with us on Facebook. You stand a chance to win yourself a set of Knitpro Karbonz Sock Knitting needles and a lovely hank of Manos Alegria 4 ply Sock Yarn. As you are about to read a whole swathe of text we’ll pop in the odd image of a sock, just for light relief. Onward:

Knit Stocking
Circa. 1885
Presented as published in The Jenny June Series of Manuals for Ladies Knitting and Crochet A Guide to the use of the Needle & Hook.

In setting the heel, slip the first stitch, knit the second, and proceed in this manner throughout the row. Between every fifth and sixth stitch make a stitch. This is necessary to keep the width of the heel, as otherwise it will draw in. Seam or purl back, and proceed as before, taking care to always slip the same stitch in each row. The result will be a very durable heel.

First bit: Exif_JPEG_PICTURE

Some light relief

Next bit:

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Some more light relief

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Graffiti by the lovely Shy Lion

Last bit:

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Are you wondering, as we are, why such a person would want to remain Anonymous?

And to end off, you decide, fact or fiction?:
Apparently the world’s smallest socks ‘less than a quarter inch long’ were made for the pet mice of Tsar Nicholas II ‘to see them through Moscow’s brutal winters.’ Unfortunately, this story has a brutal ending. ‘The art of micro-knitting died with Olenka Lanskova, sock maker to the Romanov dynasty. She was assassinated in her work room by an enraged peasant who shouted ‘If the people don’t have shoes, the Tsar’s mice shan’t have socks!’
When someone suggested to Lenin that those few, simple words should become the catch phrase of the revolution, he replied, ‘I think we’ll pass on that one.’

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We are eagerly awaiting the arrival of our Manos yarns. You can read all about the yarn over here.

As always we wish you happy knitting and crafting. Don’t forget to make at least one beautiful thing on a regular basis!

 

Alpaca Mittens for the Anzac Day Long Week End

Alpaca Crochet Mittens

There’s still time to run into the store and buy the Morris and Sons 8 ply Alpaca needed for these.

Mittens
Materials:1 x 50g Morris Maya 8 ply. Sample in 3819 Ablaze (MC) and 1 x 50g Morris Maya 8 ply, 3817 Harvest (CC)
Needles: 3.50mm crochet hook
Tension: on 3.50mm hook measured over 10cm equals 22sts x 11 rows.
These mittens have a left hand and right hand respectively. This way the seam line formed by the beginning and end of the round is in the palm of the hand.
To fit: an average woman’s hand

NOTE: We used 1 x 50g MC for a pair of mittens. We had about 2metres left. Work sparingly and check your tension so you don’t run out of yarn!

Abbreviations: (Bristish crochet terms are used throughout).
Ch – chain ; Tr – treble ; Dc – double crochet ; Rep – repeat
2 dc Cluster – yrh, work into the side of previous dc, yrh, pull through, yrh pull through first 2sts, yrh, work into side of previous dc, yrh, pull through, yrh, pull through first 2 sts and then through remaining 3sts.
sk2sts – skip 2 stitches
yrh – yarn round hook.

METHOD
Left Hand
Using 3.50mm crochet hook and MC chain 42. Join with a slip stitch in first chain to form a ring.
Round 1: ch3 (this counts as 1tr throughout), 1tr in each stitch around. Join with a slip stitch in top of 3rd chain. (42 sts, includes beginning 3ch).
Round 2 and 3: rep round 1.
Round 4: ch3, 23tr into next 23 sts, ch10, skip 4 sts, 14tr to the end of the round. Join with a slip stitch in top of 3rd chain. (thumb hole made)
Round 5: ch3, 1tr in each stitch around, including 10ch for thumb. Join with a slip stitch in top of 3rd chain. (48sts, includes beginning 3ch)
Round 6: ch3, 24tr, tr2tog, tr4, tr2tog, tr15, join with a slip stitch in top of 3rd chain.
Round 7: ch3, tr24, tr2tog, tr2, tr2tog, tr15, join with a slip stitch in top of 3rd chain.
Round 8: ch3, tr23, tr2tog, tr2, tr2tog, tr14, join with a slip stitch in top of 3rd chain.
Round 9: ch3, tr22, tr2tog, tr2, tr2tog, tr13, join with a slip stitch in top of 3rd chain.
Round 10: ch3, tr21, tr2tog, tr2, tr2tog, tr12, join with a slip stitch in top of 3rd chain.
Round 11: ch3, tr20, tr2tog, tr2, tr2tog, tr11, join with a slip stitch in top of 3rd chain.
Round 12: ch3, tr21, tr2tog, tr12, join with a slip stitch in top of 3rd chain.
Round 13: ch3, tr20, tr2tog, tr12, join with a slip stitch in top of 3rd chain.
Round 14: ch3, tr19, tr2tog, tr12, join with a slip stitch in top of 3rd chain.
Round 15: ch3, tr18, tr2tog, tr12, join with a slip stitch in top of 3rd chain. (31sts)
Round 16 and 17: 3ch, tr31sts, no shaping.
Edging around wrist end of the mitten:
Join in CC to the top of the mitten at the seam line.
Round 1: Ch1, dc30sts around top of mitt. End round with a slip stitch into 1st chain.

Alpace Crochet Mittens 2

 

Edging around fingers:
Join in CC to the bottom (finger end) of the mittens at the seam line
Round 1: ch1, 41dc in each stitch around. Join with a slip stitch in top of 1st chain. (42sts)
Round 2 and 3: repeat round 1.
Round 4: ch1, dc in first st, *ch3, 2dc cluster in side of last dc worked, sk2sts, dc in next st, rep from * across. Fasten off.
Right Hand
Using 3.50mm crochet hook and MC chain 42. Join with a slip stitch in first chain to form a ring.
Round 1: ch3 (this counts as 1tr), 1tr in each stitch around. Join with a slip stitch in top of 3rd chain. (42 sts in total).
Round 2 and 3: rep round 1.
Round 4: ch3, 13tr into next 13 sts, ch10, skip 4 sts, 24tr to the end of the round. Join with a slip stitch in top of 3rd chain. (thumb hole made)
Round 5: ch3, 1tr in each stitch around, including 10ch for thumb. Join with a slip stitch in top of 3rd chain. (48sts includes beginning 3ch)
Round 6: ch3, 14tr, tr2tog, tr4, tr2tog, tr25, join with a slip stitch in top of 3rd chain.
Round 7: ch3, 14tr, tr2tog, tr2, tr2tog, tr25, join with a slip stitch in top of 3rd chain.
Round 8: ch3, 13tr, tr2tog, tr2, tr2tog, tr24, join with a slip stitch in top of 3rd chain.
Round 9: ch3, 12tr, tr2tog, tr2, tr2tog, tr23, join with a slip stitch in top of 3rd chain.
Round 10: ch3, 11tr, tr2tog, tr2, tr2tog, tr22, join with a slip stitch in top of 3rd chain.
Round 11: ch3, 10tr, tr2tog, tr2, tr2tog, tr21, join with a slip stitch in top of 3rd chain.
Round 12: ch3, 11tr, tr2tog, tr22, join with a slip stitch in top of 3rd chain.
Round 13: ch3, 11tr, tr2tog, tr21, join with a slip stitch in top of 3rd chain.
Round 14: ch3, 11tr, tr2tog, tr20, join with a slip stitch in top of 3rd chain.
Round 15: ch3, 11tr, tr2tog, tr19, join with a slip stitch in top of 3rd chain.
Round 16 and 17: 3ch, tr31sts, no shaping.
Finish edgings as for other mitten.

Have an enjoyable long week end. We hope you do get round to making a pair or two of these. If you do, remember we love to see your work.